Announcement

Collapse

Terms of Use Agreement

1. You agree, through your use of these public Forums, not to post any material which is unlawful, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, sexually orientated, abusive, hateful, harassing, threatening, harmful, invasive of privacy or publicity rights, inflammatory or otherwise objectionable. You also agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you. You further agree not to use these public Forums for advertising or other commercial enterprise purposes. Any questions directed to, or concerning the administration of this website, will be sent to admin@popasmoke.com and not posted to the public Forums.

2. All postings express the views of the author, and neither the administrators nor POPASMOKE will be held responsible for the content of any postings submitted by the Members or anyone else. The administrators of these Forums reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any postings for any reason. Members who make postings on the Forums which are not in accordance with the Terms of Use Agreement, risk having their posting privileges withdrawn.
See more
See less

Helo Crews in Japam

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Helo Crews in Japam / Temps in RVN

    Maybeso,we're getting a little off the subject line here.,but in an attempt at mediation.,I'd like to make a comment or two.
    During the monsoon season of '66/'67.,I spent beau coups time up in the high country,boring holes in the sky. In all that time,I never PERSONALLY saw any ice or frost AGL. However,it sure as hell felt like there ought to be. I felt bad for our troopers on the ground...they were wet ALL the time.
    I often saw them using their ponchos as wind-breakers in the cabin of my bird. By then,the 'tin-benders' had given up on replacing damaged & missing Plexiglas & the wind coming into that '46 felt like it was coming straight off the polar ice cap.
    Supply at Phu Bai had scads of old issue green wool shirts (still sealed in plastic bags) supposedly,for issue. I NEVER SAW ANY OF THEM BEING ISSUED !!! Thru the 'bartering' process,I picked up several shirts for personal use.
    Uniform of the day for me in the high country was..,standard issue ute trousers,t-shirt,green wool shirt,green wool flight suit,& my G-1 flight jacket during the season. That's the only time that I would wear one of those scratchy,smelly suits.
    Craze

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Helo Crews in Japam

      Craze, can you call me 580-298-3747. I'll call back on my nickle. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Helo Crews in Japam

        With the wind pouring through that port side hatch on the H-34 cruising up by Cunningham in February, it felt like it was freezing. I remember having trouble loading a belt into the M-60 with fingers that wouldn't move.

        Wayne Stafford

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Helo Crews in Japan

          Col Marsh has put up a picture looking out a snow covered frozen windscreen and the comment:
          "has learned the hard way that power bars and cliff bar freeze solid when flying in these temperatures"
          I'd feel for him but it's the poor crew chief that has to get out there and clean it off
          READY - SQUAT THRUST - BEGIN

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Helo Crews in Japam

            Dale, glad its snowing there rather than here. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Helo Crews in Japan/Frozen Dragons

              Lt. Col. Marsh: " Ice, snow, and freezing rain continue to hamper our efforts to deliver supplies up north. We really could use a couple clear days."

              Sounds like he could be flying in the northeast here, except he posted a short 35 second video which shows a snow covered Japan AND a "gizmo" to count how much radiation they are being exposed to..... BAD $%*!
              READY - SQUAT THRUST - BEGIN

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Helo Crews in Japam-melt-downs

                Hate it Dale. I believe Japan is not telling what is really happening with the reactors. It would be good for clear weather so the relief supplies could be delevered by the Dragons. If they melt down, obamma will let us have several million instant Americans, as Japan will be Hot all over. The ships will have to stay there a long time just to make drinking water for them. The crews have to get the radiation off them I believe after each mission now, when they Fly. Glad we only have small earthquakes here in Okie land. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Helo Crews in Japan

                  I just came accross this Facebook link to the squadron:

                  http://www.facebook.com/pages/HMM-26...11970095519162
                  READY - SQUAT THRUST - BEGIN

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Helo Crews in Japam

                    We flew at 10000 for helo drops during the monsoon season out of Quang Tri and it was damned cold. We, the crews flying those missions, were issued flight jackets. In fact years ago I posted a picture of some of us in flight jackets. Look in HMM 161's photos. And we did worry about blade icing. Don't think we ever accumulated any ice but it WAS worried about.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Helo Crews in Japam

                      Originally posted by johnyr46 View Post
                      We flew at 10000 for helo drops during the monsoon season out of Quang Tri and it was damned cold. We, the crews flying those missions, were issued flight jackets. In fact years ago I posted a picture of some of us in flight jackets. Look in HMM 161's photos. And we did worry about blade icing. Don't think we ever accumulated any ice but it WAS worried about.
                      Roger that; Think of the boys in 161 in Korea flying open cabin from 51 to 53 with winter temps hitting 20-25 degrees below zero...and doing it all day long.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Helo Crews in Japan

                        Originally posted by Dale A Riley View Post
                        On Col. Marsh's posts - they call it "Operation Tomodachi"
                        If I remember from Futenma correct that means "friends"?? Anyone know for sure?
                        I remember it cause they refered to the crabs as "little friends" and it was something like - chisi tomodachi - I think.
                        You are right on. Tomodachi does mean friend. Served in Japan from 53-54 and did manage to pick up some local dialect. I wonder how?

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X