Announcement

Collapse

Terms of Use Agreement

1. You agree, through your use of these public Forums, not to post any material which is unlawful, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, sexually orientated, abusive, hateful, harassing, threatening, harmful, invasive of privacy or publicity rights, inflammatory or otherwise objectionable. You also agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you. You further agree not to use these public Forums for advertising or other commercial enterprise purposes. Any questions directed to, or concerning the administration of this website, will be sent to admin@popasmoke.com and not posted to the public Forums.

2. All postings express the views of the author, and neither the administrators nor POPASMOKE will be held responsible for the content of any postings submitted by the Members or anyone else. The administrators of these Forums reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any postings for any reason. Members who make postings on the Forums which are not in accordance with the Terms of Use Agreement, risk having their posting privileges withdrawn.
See more
See less

34 model

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Sirs, two questions, 'Droop snoot blades' & 'Ready App'?

    Many thanks, Flag track.

    Comment


    • #32
      34 model

      Well Flag Trac, Droop Snoot Blades on the 46 were called that, in my opinion, because they were 13 inches, to a foot longer than the stock blades that came on the Bird from the Manufacturer. We that wanted them did so because I'd rather have 6 ft more of lift power, than Not. They gave the Bird more lift simply put. A number of Crew Chiefs did not care for them, for various reasons. I did as I wanted as much lift as I could get. The READY-APP, is the 1st thing the Pilot asks the Crew Chief on turn up, and if the Hydrolic System that starts the Auxilliary Power Plant is pumped up enough with enough Pressure to crank the APP, the Crew Chief would respond by saying 'Ready-APP, with a Sir, depending on the Pilot. The Crew Chief would stand by the handle that pumped the Hydrolic System up, in case the Pilot waited to long to hit the ignighters to start the APP. If the APP would not start, the Crew Chief would have to start pumping very hard, and fast, until the APP's RPM would get at, or above the ignition point. I did that many times, and it is not fun at all, believe me. If the Pilot missed it, then the whole System would have to be pumped up for 20-30 minutes, and it took time away from the Mission. Not many Crew Chiefs could on APP wind down, pump the Hydrolic System back up, at or above the APP's start RPM. I did every time a Pilot missed it. Never had to take the 20-30 minutes to stop all, and just pump it up again to the high pressure required to start the APP. Believe the pressure required to crank the thing was at least 3500 lbs of Hyd. pressure. I close all my posts with - Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

      Comment


      • #33
        Now John...

        ...am I to believe that the handle never broke while you pumped? One hundred per cent success with that weak part is pretty darn good.
        /s/ray

        Raymond J. Norton
        1513 Bordeaux Place
        Norfolk, VA 23509-1313

        (757) 623-1644

        Comment


        • #34
          34 model.....Now John

          Yes Ray, you can rest assured that the handle on all 5 of the Birds I was on, during training, and the 3 as Crew Chief, did Not break, or bend ONE TIME the entire time I had to pump to assist the stored up Hyd. Pressure, to help start the APP. I did not scrub even ONE mission, and completed every mission but one, when I was shot down, on 2 July,'69. My Birds always launched on time, and we stayed out until we had all of our Missions for the Day completed. Not all can say that, but I certainly can. Thank you. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Flag Track View Post
            Sirs, two questions, 'Droop snoot blades' & 'Ready App'?

            Many thanks, Flag track.
            "Droop-snoot" blades were a required mod to accompany installation of the more powerful dash 10 engines.This to increase lift & max payload.
            Called "droop-snoot" because the larger size & wgt. dictated that they had a tendency to pitch off over their length at static.
            "Ready APP" is SOP voice comm. between crewchief & pilot on spin-up.
            The CH-46 had a small turbine engine located above & between the powerplants & known as an auxiliary power plant or APP.(more commonly referred to as the 'ape')
            The C/C stood by outside the a/c with a fire bottle while the fires were lit & comm. went as follows:
            "Ready APE.,Ready '1'.,Ready '2'.,Clear to turn,sir."
            S/F,Mike
            TAKE NO PRISONERS.,SHOW NO MERCY.
            DEATH SMILES AT EVERYONE...,MARINES SMILE BACK...

            Comment


            • #36
              34 model

              Thats what I was saying Mike. I know we in 265 even though we had the A model, had the droop-snoot Blades. Our procedure was the Crew Chief would stand by with his right hand on the lever that pumped up the start Hydrolic pressure for the APP, ready to pump if the Pilot didn't hit the ignition at the right time. When the APP was started, we then moved back behind, and to the side of the Bird, and the Crew Chief would say Ready to crank #1, and the Pilot would try to start the #1 engine. (We were allowed 3 Hot starts before the engine was changed). When the #1 engine was turning, we then would go to the starbord side, and tell the Pilot Ready to crank #2. After the engines were turning, the Crew Chief would then un-wind the long cord, and get out to the middle of the Bird for the Blades to turn. We would say 'clear to turn, sir'. If it was a good turn up, with no blades jumping around, we coiled the cord up on either arm, and got on the ramp, and made way to the Crew Chief seat, sat down, and with the left shoulder would throw our weight against it to see if it was secure even though the lock lever was in the lock posisition. We were rolling by then to wherever we were going to lift off for the mission. We never took a fire extinguisher with us, as thats the way I was trained, and There never was an engine fire during my Flight time, on any of the 5 Birds I was on. Had #11, with Paul Davis, the Hoist Bird for 2 weeks, and was with 'Gomer' on #13 'the Goblin', for 2 weeks. After 198 Combat Missions for the month, It was time for my check ride. I became Crew Chief at the end of the Day. As Crew Chief, I had 3-#14's before I was evaced. I loved it, and would surely do it again. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

              Comment


              • #37
                I knew I found a picture somewhere, (Picture found on a public source) French 34
                20mm in front .50 in back, no room for troops though, seems high on oleos Oh and the YP20 models tail rotor has the blades pointing the wrong way, just so picky ain't I!

                Regards, Flag T
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #38
                  34 model

                  Wish they had made the cabin bigger. It was good at picking up space capsules, but couldn't carry much over 10-12 troops, with an m-60. Semper Fi, and READY-APP.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X